{{Cart.NumberOfCartItems}} 0

Giant Ambassador George Fox Offers His Tips For Getting Into Time Trialling

21 June 2019

Blogs

Don’t be put off racing by super duper racing thoroughbreds such as the Giant Trinity. The Trinity itself is amazingly versatile in terms of adjustment and there is not a lot you can’t do to it, however the majority of us just have the one bike and so think that racing might not be doable! What is the key? Remember that your body can be as much as 80-85% of the overall aerodynamic dr...

Don’t be put off racing by super duper racing thoroughbreds such as the Giant Trinity. The Trinity itself is amazingly versatile in terms of adjustment and there is not a lot you can’t do to it, however the majority of us just have the one bike and so think that racing might not be doable!

What is the key?

Remember that your body can be as much as 80-85% of the overall aerodynamic drag, so when we look at speeds that are achievable your body will make a HUGE difference. The crucial part to this is to get the right sized bike to start with, your local giant dealer will be able to help with this, or the size guide for the specific bikes you’re looking at will also prove to be a great guide!

If your bike is the right size you will be able to adopt many different positions such as on the drops, on the hoods or on the hoods with dropped elbows. The last position mentioned there is my personal favourite, it replicates a stereotypical time trial back shape and allows me to drop my head down in line with my back.

Let's say I have improved my body shape aerodynamically by 20%, that’s 20% of 85% so an overall saving of 17% in aerodynamic drag!

So what is actually possible on a standard road bike?


I recently put my Propel Disc to the test, we know it is an extremely aerodynamic frame but the geometry of the Propel also helps a great position to be doable.

I took to my local 10 mile time trial course that I have ridden many times over the last 9 years to see how the times would compare and the results were amazing. By replicating a stereotypical time trial position by dropping the elbows whilst holding the hoods I was able to average 31.2mph and finish with a time of 19 minutes and 18 seconds, this time matched my best on the course to the second which was done last year on my Trinity TT.

What is the catch?

So this year I averaged a higher amount of power therefore showing that aerodynamically the Trinity position, as it should be, is better however getting as close as I was able to on a road bike shows that there really is no barrier to getting into racing.

Most club time trials will cost between £3 and £5 and you can find a local club that is running one nearly every night of the week locally!

Share

More news

News sections